Final Project: @dogebard

For my final project, I adapted my existing Twitter bot, @dogebard, from a Google spreadsheet-powered bot to a Javascript-powered bot using Node.js and this convenient library named node-twitterbot. The result is a Twitter bot that collects 50 of @IAM_SHAKESPEARE‘s latest tweets, runs them through a modified shibe generator, and tweets the resulting output, whatever that may be. It only takes a few extra lines of code to shibe-ify anyone’s Twitter account, so I could technically do this for anyone’s Twitter, so long as I can access it through the Twitter API.

This is more a proof-of-concept than an actual running Twitter bot, however, as I haven’t yet set up an online server to have the bot tweet using this method. I can still test it from my computer, and it works perfectly.

My process was basically this:

  • Convert Erty Seidel’s Shibe Generator into a standalone .js script
  • Connect @dogebard to my own personal Node.js server on my computer
  • Use node-twitterbot and Twit libraries (using the Twitter API) to tweet as @dogebard

After downloading Node.js and getting it to run through Notepad++, I tweaked the Shibe Generator to accept input from any string, rather than from the HTML document. I also hard-coded all the values in, since I can just change them by going directly into the script. Then I set up node-twitterbot and linked @dogebard to said Twitter bot using a few loopholes (I had to get a Google Voice number to be able to tweet as @dogebard through the node-twitterbot libraries). Finally, after testing the bot and making sure that it ran correctly, I wrote the chunk of code that would collect @IAM_SHAKESPEARE’s tweets, run the string through the shibe generator, and tweet it from the @dogebard account.

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Meditation #8

For this meditation, I combined Shakespeare’s Hamlet with this doge text generator to get @dogebard, a Twitter account that tweets randomly generated Doge Meme-like text using Hamlet as its source. Here’s a picture of the settings I used for the generator:

dogesettings

It’s pretty ridiculous and mostly comes out to a bunch of random nouns and adjectives, some of which sound Shakespearean, but many of which doesn’t necessarily sound like Shakespeare without context. A few of the lines work, but it’s easy to tell that the list has been randomly generated. The bot also features liberal overuse of the words “such,” “much,” and “very,” which can get tiring if you’re only reading the list of tweets, but in the context of the timeline I can imagine it being kind of surprising and funny.  There are about 200 or so lines (as of this writing), so by the time it finishes tweeting, it will have produced a decent amount of output featuring words, places, and people from Shakespeare’s Hamlet.

dogesettings

Meditation #7

For my meditation 7, I decided to create a sort of Twitter parody account, found here, parodying foodies and people’s obsessions with taking pictures of their meals before they eat and posting them on Twitter. I knew I wanted something historical-related, so I found this menu from a recipe website containing the full twelve-course dinner served on the day the Titanic sunk. I also found the time the Titanic crashed, 11:40 on April 14, 1912, and decided I would incorporate that into my piece as well. The food pictures were taken off of Google Images, but I tried to use the ones that looked a little less than professional.

The result is a weird mash-up of present-day trendiness and historical tragedy, and it’s meant to be completely humorous and a little on the nose. The tweets mostly consist of the character gushing over their meal, though over time the character begins to grow tired of all of the food because there’s simply too much. At 11:47, the character using the account hears a strange noise, and finally, at 11:53, the character notices that the ship is sinking.

For some reason, though the account is set to American Eastern Time, the timestamp is still using West Coast Time, though I did post it around 11:47 according to my computer clock.

Capturehw

Meditation #6

For my meditation #6, I went to a public park, and used magnets to write on one of the shelters. The letter magnets, combined with the fact that I had to substitute some letters for numbers, gave it a very childish, kind of amateur effect. “No pets allowed” might be a little weird to see at a public park, though there are other, weirder places that have banned animals. “No humans allowed,” on the other hand, immediately gives it a different connotation.

For this piece, I think, it’s interesting to juxtapose the word “pets” versus the word “humans.” As people, we assume that we’re allowed to go pretty much anywhere we can reach. Who would put a sign up that says “No humans allowed,” especially at a public park? The pets, maybe…

IMG_0027 IMG_0033 IMG_0039

The last image is a little different, but it takes advantage of the stickiness of the magnets and the ability of words to go into some really strange, physical places. The position of the words mimics the position of the spider web itself, which recreates the feel of a spider web better in 3D space than just the word “spiderweb” would.

Meditation #5

For Meditation #5, I used the Markov chain generator and Kazemi’s GenGen.

For the first part, I used an excerpt from the beginning of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland as the source text (from “Alice was beginning to get very tired…” to “she very soon finished it off.”). Being a weirdly lyrical nonsense text already, I figured it would make a great source material for rule-based generative text. Here’s the result:

and not a moment:
she was just in a dreamy
sort of way, and even if I fell very few think I could there
was not a VERY deeply with
cupboards and that an
ignorant little use with the doors all dark to think nothing on it into a small,
but at all think I could managed to looked up on to the second
time to drop the looked at think I could
shut up by wild
beasts and
picking again.

Suddenly, thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump! thump!

The “thump!”s are a result of there only being two instances of “thump!” in the entire excerpt, and the first one is always followed by another “thump!” So occasionally I’d get these long series of “thump!”s, which is kind of interesting and kind of creepy at the same time.

Here’s another example I liked, maybe because it involved various descriptions:

that’s very little girl she’ll the neck of rules for asking! No, it’ll seemed to her saucer of mixed flavour
of cherry-tart, custard, pine-apple, roast turkey, and some way this, but your
finger to be late it’s getting
somewhere were down and dry leaves, and whiskers, how late it’s marked “poison” or not’; for some way think I could, for some way to hear the right on like to an end! ‘I wonder about fifteen inches high: she
saw maps and dry leaves, and then hurry. ‘No, I’ll looked at think you see, as the table, all see it written up by a row of lamps hanging
from a book,’ thought words to get

For the second part, I went into Google spreadsheets and made a generator, based on the phrase “I can’t believe it’s not butter” with some bizarre word choices thrown in with some regular ones, creating results such as “I couldn’t fathom it’s not alien slime on my biscuit,” among others. Here are some examples:

I could not possibly fathom it’s not lard on my biscuit

I can’t believe it’s not margarine on my slice of bread

I couldn’t fathom it’s not Soylent Green on my hardtack

I could not possibly fathom it’s not fossilized detritus on my toast

The spreadsheet can be found here.

Meditation #4

1) For the first part, I transcribed part of a YouTube video, https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=DoWLk5ybI7g.

I used an iterative process to transcribe the conversation: first, I transcribed just the words, then I added the pauses and parentheses where I was unsure of what was being said. Then I added notation for breathing sounds. Lastly I added notation for stress and intonation, and then went over it again while watching the video in case I missed anything. I also added line breaks for long pauses in SL’s dialogue.

The notation’s pretty sparse, though I tend to take a minimalistic approach to a lot of things, so that doesn’t surprise me. I added notations for what sounds were being emphasized, mostly, and what I couldn’t hear, and omitted the fact that there was wind blowing and cars passing by constantly in the background. In essence, I focused on what was being said and put less emphasis on everything else. I also lost patience for listening to the same audio over and over again so I stopped after maybe 45 minutes; I know I don’t like listening to repetitive noises. It’s a pet peeve of mine.

SL: Samuel Levy.

LB: Sa:mmy Levy?

SL: Yeah, Sa:muel Levy.

SL: (I’m) 22. I’m from Brooklyn, New York.

My small story is (.) I’m a New Yorker.

LB: New Yorker?

SL: Yeah, to the heart.

LB: Born and raised?

SL: Born and raised in New York, I was raised in Queens:. .pt South Jamaica. I lived there (h) since (.) I was five till I was about eighteen.

After that, (.) (hhh) I moved to Baltimore.

I started to go to school out in Baltimore.

I got a scholarship to go to college.

LB: (h) Where’d you go to college?

SL: .pt I went to college (in) Baltimore City Community College. Nice program (there), studied business management.

(Un)fortunately, I didn’t finish, you know? But I did start working (at) Papa John’s:, while I was in Baltimore.

2) For the second part, I transcribed the DVD box for the special widescreen edition of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. I transcribed the text starting with the top of the box, then the left side of the box, then the right side of the box and finally the back. For the back of the box, I went top to bottom and left to right, and transcribed as much of the text of the logos as I thought was reasonable.

I literally transcribed every bit of text on the box I could find, so when it comes to text-to-text transcriptions, at least, I’m very thorough. Compared to the other one, I was at least more confident about what I needed to put in. When it comes to transcribing dialogue, I’m not familiar with the notation or what exactly I should be listening for, but text-to-text transcription seems a lot more straightforward.

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

SPECIAL WIDESCREEN EDITION

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

DVD VIDEO

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

22467

DVD VIDEO

WB WARNER HOME VIDEO

WB WARNER HOME VIDEO

TWO DISC SET

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

22467

DVD VIDEO

YEAR ONE

“’The Wizard of Oz’ of its time. A complete triumph”

– Richard Roeper, “EBERT & ROEPER”

ISBN 0-7907-6735-X

0 85392 24672 4

Special Features

Never-before-seen footage

Self-guided tour of Hogwarts

Mix potions, perform transfigurations, explore Diagon Alley, catch a snitch, and much, much more

Theatrical Trailers

Scene Access

Languages & Subtitles:

English & Espanol

DVD-ROM PC* FEATURES:

Collect Wizard trading cards

Be Sorted by the Sorting Hat

Download screensaver and Remembrall

Receive owl e-mails

Link to the Web*

WARNER BROS. PICTURES PRESENTS

A HEYDAY FILMS/1492 PICTURES/DUNCAN HENDERSON PRODUCTION A CHRIS COLUMBUS FILM “HARRY POTTER AND THE SORCERER’S STONE”

DANIEL RADCLIFFE RUPERT GRINT EMMA WATSON STARRING JOHN CLEESE ROBBIE COLTRANE WARWICK DAVIS RICHARD GRIFFITHS

RICHARD HARRIS IAN HART JOHN HURT ALAN RICKMAN FIONA SHAW MAGGIE SMITH JULIE WALTERS

MUSIC BY JOHN WILLIAMS EDITED BY RICHARD FRANCIS-BRUCE, A.C.E. PRODUCTION DESIGNER STUART CRAIG DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY JOHN SEALE, A.C.S., A.S.C.

EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS CHRIS COLUMBUS MARK RADCLIFFE MICHAEL BARNATHAN DUNCAN HENDERSON SCREENPLAY BY STEVE KLOVES BASED ON THE NOVEL BY J.K. ROWLING

PRODUCED BY DAVID HEYMAN DIRECTED BY CHRIS COLUMBUS

Soundtrack Album on Warner Sunset/Atlantic Records WARNER BROS. PICTURES AN AOL TIME WARNER COMPANY WB WARNER BROS PICTURES

http://www.harrypotter.com America Online Keyword: Harry Potter http://www.warnervideo.com

NOT AUTHORIZED FOR SALE OR RENTAL OUTSIDE THE USA AND CANADA: This copyrighted product has been manufactured and distributed by Warner Home Video, an AOL Time Warner Company, and is authorized for sale or rental for private home use in the USA and Canada ONLY. The sale or rental of this product outside of the USA and Canada has NOT been authorized by Warner Home Video, and is in direct violation of its written terms of trade. Federal law provides severe civil and criminal penalties for the unauthorized distribution, reproduction or exhibition of copyrighted motion pictures, videotapes or videodiscs.

WB WARNER HOME VIDEO Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. Artwork & Photography C 2001 Warner Bros. Other Supplementary Material, Package Artwork, Design & Summary C 2002 Warner Home Video, an AOL Time Warner Company. 4000 Warner Blvd., Burbank, CA 91522. Harry Potter Publishing Rights C J.K. Rowling. HARRY POTTER, characters, names, and related indicia are trademarks of and C Warner Bros. (s02)

“Dolby” and the DD symbol are trademarks of Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corporation. *System Requirements: Microsoft Windows 95 or higher, DVD-ROM drive, DVD software or hardware decoder, 166 MHz Pentium processor, 32 MB RAM, 5-20 MB available hard disc space, Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.0 or higher (included on disc). Some features require Internet connection. This DVD will not work in a CD-ROM drive. The enhanced DVD-ROM features will not work on a Macintosh computer. Windows is either a registered trademark or trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.

**InterActual, PCFriendly, and the PCFriendly 2.0 logo are either trademarks or registered trademarks of InterActual Technologies, Inc.

WIDESCREEN VERSION PRESENTED IN A “LETTERBOX” WIDESCREEN FORMAT PRESERVING THE “SCOPE” ASPECT RATIO OF ITS ORIGINAL THEATRICAL EXHIBITION. ENHANCED FOR WIDESCREEN TVS.

DUAL-LAYER FORMAT

DVD VIDEO 1 PG PARENTAL GUIDANCE SUGGESTED Some Scary Moments and Mild Language Color/152 Min. Dolby Digital ENGLISH: 5.1 Dolby Digital EX ESPANOL: 5.1 Dolby Digital EX CC InterActual I PCFRIENDLY 2.0

Meditation #3

For my meditation 3, I used the plain text of Paradise Lost from gutenberg.org and messed around with it. Here’s the result, which involved replacing instances of the word “hell” with the word “hipsters” and making the text sound totally ridiculous:

The chief were those who from the Pit of hipsters
And black GEHENNA call’d, the Type of hipsters.
Till good JOSIAH drove them thence to hipsters.
Fell not from Heaven, or more gross to love
A shout that tore hipsters Concave, and beyond
Thir Glory witherd. As when Heavens Fire
Should favour equal to the Sons of Heaven:
Far round illumin’d hipsters: highly they rag’d
Arm’d with hipsters’ flames and fury all at once
By force, and at our heels all hipsters should rise
Must’ring thir rage,
Then hipsters dread Emperour with pomp Supream,
Heard farr and wide, and all the host of hipsters
In whirlwind; hipsters scarce hold the wilde uproar.
If shape it might be call’d that shape had none
Distinguishable in member, joynt, or limb,
Or substance might be call’d that shadow seem’d,
For each seem’d either; black it stood as Night,
Fierce as ten Furies, terrible as hipsters,
And shook a dreadful Dart; what seem’d his head
The likeness of a Kingly Crown had on.
SATAN was now at hand, and from his seat
The Monster moving onward came as fast,
With horrid strides, hipsters trembled as he strode.

My exact process consisted of the following:

  1. First, I extracted the entire text of Paradise Lost, then filtered it so the output only retained every line that had the word “heaven” or “hell” in it.
  2. Next, I replaced all the instances of the word “hell” with the word “hipsters.” Since it was too long, I only took an excerpt of the output, starting with the line “The chief were those…” and ending with the line “In whirlwind…”
  3. I removed every line that contained the phrase “in hipsters” so that the piece would read a little more naturally, and edited the line “Must’ring thir rage, and Heav’n resembles Hell?” to simply “Must’ring thir rage” to make it flow better.
  4. Finally, to end it, I took an excerpt from the poem that started with “If shape it might be call’d…” and ended with “With horrid strides…” and replaced “hell” with “hipsters” again.

The resulting poem is a semi-coherent account of a vision of hell populated exclusively by raging, flaming hipsters, who are likely all there on the account of annoying everyone else to an unforgivable degree.

Then, I took a JPEG of this cat, took chunks of the code and repeated them throughout the file while deleting several lines here and there, and dumped some Java code and plain text in sections of the file. Here’s the result, with the glitched file on the left and the original on the right:

99059361-choose-cat-litter-632x475 - Copy - Copy2 99059361-choose-cat-litter-632x475 - Copy